Wireless Smartphone Strategies

The industry’s most comprehensive set of critical market statistics and qualitative analysis, tracking and reporting on smartphones.

March 27, 2015 06:25 lsui

According to the latest report from our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, global online channels will make up a significant 19% of all smartphone sales in 2015, of which pure e-retailers will contribute 8% of total global smartphone volume share. China and India lead the pack with the highest e-retailer share.

Jingdong is the largest e-retailer in China. In India, Flipkart remains the largest player.

Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) clients can please click here to access the full report.


January 27, 2015 05:26 lsui

Motorola has recently announced to reenter China by launching Moto X, Moto G and Moto X Pro, three smartphone models, on Jan 26th, 2015, in Beijing. More than one year has passed since Motorola previously completely pulled out from the world's largest smartphone market in the second half of 2013.

Moto X and Moto Pro target the premium-tier segment, and Moto G, one of Motorola's best-selling models in 2014, eyes the mid-tier segment. Motorola will work closely with online retailers to sell the three phones, including Jingdong, T-Mall etc.

Motorola believe their key differentiators are full technology enablement (e.g. supporting China Mobile, China Telecom and China Unicom for all 3G and 4G technologies), a "pure" Android UI, as well as customized service / software offerings. However, there are already many full-technology-enabled models from ZTE and other local vendors available in China at the moment. Those latter two models from Motorola will find it hard to stand out from rivals.

Reintroducing Motorola-branded phones to China will dilute Lenovo's shift up-tier and also its online intiatives. Lenovo has the Vibe sub-brand targeting premium-tier segments, and it has just set up an online sub-brand and division -- Magic Factory -- in H2 2014. For Lenovo and Motorola, it will be a challenge to balance and manage these multiple brands in such a crowded Chinese marketplace this year.

Moreover, it remains to be seen whether Chinese consumers still value the Motorola brand and whether they will embrace a "new" Motorola. For us, this looks like a risky move by a struggling Lenovo desperate to re-jazz its fading smartphone growth at home.

NI HAO, MOTO!


January 22, 2015 07:47 PLin

According to the latest report, Global Smartphone Sales Forecast: Offline vs. Online -- from our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) research service -- the distribution of smartphones through online channels will grow an above-average +21% worldwide in 2015. North America, Western Europe and China are especially active, and those regions are experiencing a Golden Age for online smartphone distribution.

Our report forecasts global smartphone offline and online distribution flows for 6 major regions and 3 key countries from 2007 to 2020, including North America, Western Europe, Latin America, China, Japan and India. The forecasts can be used by smartphone vendors, vehicle makers, apps developers and others to identify the main regional channels where smartphones are being sold, and how rapidly online channels are emerging alongside, and in some cases displacing, offline distribution. The report is available here to clients.


January 22, 2015 07:17 PLin

According to our latest report, Global Smartphone Sale Forecast: Operators vs. Retailers -- from our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) research service -- several hundred million smartphones will flow through "closed" operator channels worldwide during 2015. Operators have traditionally dominated smartphone distribution until 2013, but retailers have surpassed operator channels since 2014 and will grow their share of the industry in the coming years.

This report forecasts global smartphone distribution flows for 6 major regions and 3 key countries from 2007 to 2020, including North America, Western Europe, Latin America, China, Japan and India. The forecasts can be used by smartphone vendors, vehicle makers, apps developers and others to identify the main regional channels where mobile phones are being sold, and whether operators or retailers are winning the distribution wars. The report is available here to clients.


June 19, 2014 23:11 swaltzer

After years of speculation, Amazon finally introduced its first Fire Phone with AT&T in the US on Wednesday, 18th June, 2014. Amazon is planning to take a slice of the global smartphone hardware industry and expand the mobile shopping market. However, the Fire is neither optimized for smartphone buyers nor mobile shoppers, and it risks getting caught in no-man’s land. This first-generation Fire may struggle to gain traction. Further insight and analysis on this topic can be found for subscribers in our published report here: Amazon Fire Puts a Shopping Cart in Your Pocket.


December 22, 2010 16:12 bjoy
Nokia has a healthy working relationship with Microsoft, and the partnership has been growing over the past few years. Recent initiatives include:
  • Microsoft Office Mobile Suite for Symbian.
  • Microsoft Sliverlight for Symbian.
  • The Nokia Booklet, a 3G netbook based on Windows 7.
On the organization front, Stephen Elop, a Microsoft veteran, took over the helms at Nokia earlier this year, bringing both companies closer than ever. While Sliverlight, Microsoft Office, and Windows 7 netbook initiatives are all signs of a healthy partnership, embracing the WP7 platform in its totality takes the relationship to the next level. Shifting the building blocks of your device/software/service ecosystem in favor of third parties is no small decision and will have effect on your intangible sub-brand assets such as Ovi. And that exactly is the rumor from this week, that Nokia will launch WP7 devices in 2011. While we have no official version of the story, it would be interesting to assess the impact of such a partnership in the market. On the positive side, Nokia’s industrial design, distribution and supply chain process are among the best in the industry. WP7 will gain a strong partner in Nokia to bring the best-in-class devices among Windows Phone series. But how much of an impact it will have on Nokia’s platform portfolio, positioning and regional priorities? Where WP7 sits in Nokia’s portfolio?                                        Given the base set of high-end hardware requirements for WP7, the Nokia WP7 device will be positioned in the same premium space occupied by the MeeGo platform. Will Nokia abandon the MeeGo platform in favor of WP7? Or are they going to co-exist, with WP7 focusing on the prosumer and business segments along the same lines of the S60 E-Series? Will there be any major shift in regional platform trends? USA: With an estimated 6% marketshare in 2010 (nearly all basic and featurephones), Nokia has been steadily losing marketshare and carrier shelf space in the US. The partnership is unlikely to change the competitive landscape in the US market, where Apple, HTC, Motorola and Samsung lead the operator shelves. WP7 LTE phones in H2 2011 / H1 2012 might be a potential option for Nokia to make inroads in the US. Western Europe: Microsoft will find more acceptance in carrier channels through Nokia in Western Europe. But beyond the “foot in the  door” strategy, the partnership will have to do little with the success of the platform. In emerging markets, where Nokia has the broadest reach in mid-tier smartphones, the WP7 will be not be the obvious choice for the cost sensitive segments. We believe Nokia will continue to rely on the S60 platform in the mid-tier smartphone segment. Overall, while the idea of a Nokia WP7 device looks like a big win for Microsoft, it’s unlikely to change the prospects of Nokia or WP7 in the smartphone department. Nevertheless, Nokia needs to raise its profile in the US, and this would be a step in the right direction, but it will need step-changes in distribution and subsidies. But for the most part, it’s going to be just another partnership for Microsoft and Nokia – you’re only as strong as your weakest link. - Bonny Joy

June 4, 2010 19:06 Neil Shah
The global handset industry continues to grow and fragment. Due to platform facilitators like MediaTek, manufacturing a 2G cellphone is easier than ever. These trends have led to the emergence of a long tail of dozens of microvendors, mostly from China and India. Numerous microvendors have benefitted from the surging demand for low-cost 2G phones in rural and suburban markets. According to our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) report for Asia, leading microvendors Micromax and Tianyu are ranked among the top 6 brands in their domestic markets of India and China. What have been the main reasons for the microvendors' growth? • OEM-partnered low-cost handset solutions; • Strong ultra-low- and entry-level portfolios at very competitive price-points; • Innovative features for local needs and tastes, such as 30-day standby battery (important feature for regular electricity deprived rural markets), torch-light, theft tracker, multimedia player, video call, AM/FM Radio and dual-SIM; • Extensive retail distribution footprints; • Aggressive advertising and brand promotions; The microvendors have gone after first-time and second-time buyers and emerged with some success. However, key questions that arise are -- how many microvendors are successfully selling and how have they originated? Is there any major differentiation between their offerings? How are the microvendors positioning their brands? What are the microvendors doing in order to compete at the next level, such as 3G smartphones? Thus, starting in Q1 2010, we are now actively tracking an additional 25 emerging microvendors every quarter. These top 25 microvendors have captured a combined 4% global marketshare. Micromax and Spice top our rankings, which include other vendors from diverse industries such as consumer electronics and personal computing. We expect the long tail of Asian vendors will remain active for the foreseeable future, as they focus their efforts on a next wave of emerging 3G handset growth in 2011. Our published Microvendors report for Q1 2010 is available to download for clients here.

May 28, 2010 02:05 tkang
Nokia has started a new market sizing exercise from the beginning of this year. With refreshing candor, they have increased the base market size over 10% for 2009 shrinking their own market share to 34% from the previous 38%.
  • Nokia announced their market share in Q1 2010 was 33%, which is probably the lowest number they’ve had in 5 years. Why would they play themselves down?
I think Nokia is accepting the hard truth that the market is bigger than we all were willing to admit. However, I don’t think that the Shanzhai (Chinese Grey Market) impact has been fully baked into many estimates.
  • Since 2007, numerous unknown small assembly factories have been springing up in China and rapidly growing. There are more than 500 companies now.
  • As urban areas in the Emerging Markets reached saturation the rural users were the next frontier but distribution, after sales support and driving down cost was a challenge. This market was successfully addressed by the so-called Shanzhai or Chinese Grey Market handsets as they evaded tax, regulatory requirements, IPR and any brand related issues giving them an advantage to the ‘I-don’t-care-about-quality-I-just-want-a-phone-that-doesn’t-look-too-cheap’ audience in the Emerging Markets.
If we look at the Chinese market it seems that foreign brands like Nokia killed the Local brands but in reality if we include the Chinese Grey Market, Local vendors have started to come back since 2007.
  • Nokia hunted down Local vendors between 2004 and 2005 but they’ve come back and without admitting that the Chinese grey market exists there’s no way you can compete with them.
clip_image002[6] Looking at the situation, I think history repeats itself. Starting from 2000, Local Chinese vendors rapidly took share from Motorola and at that time the R&D was provided by R&D houses in Korea packaging Texas Instrument basebands into modules.
  • Companies like Bellwave once exported $400M worth of GSM modules to China a year, this was the time TCL, Bird, Amoi were on the top 10 vendor list.
  • Now it’s Mediatek providing R&D expertise: the baseband and also assistance with the module packaging.
Our Wireless Device Strategies Team is preparing a report that explores the Chinese Grey Market in more depth as it is now more than 12% of the market, a market to keep track of. I think the handset market is bigger than Nokia thinks. Their market share in Q1 2010 should’ve been 31% including the total grey market.

March 17, 2010 23:03 bjoy
High-end mobile handsets have more in common with the consumer electronics industry than they used to. Music, camera and GPS segments are some of the early examples that have lost increasing ground to the mobile industry. As the industry converges further, more use-cases and functions will be bundled on high-end handsets and crimp the growth of other consumer-electronic segments such as portable gaming. Retailers are closely watching the evolution of cellular devices and treading the waters carefully. Connectivity will of course be common across multiple device categories, whether it is your 65-inch Plasma TV or internet-enabled table clock – and for the most part, this is a new learning experience for major main-street retailers. Connectivity adds another dimension and requires additional training for their customer representatives – initial set up, configuration, billing, activation, rebates and contract obligations are areas where retailers need to climb up the experience ladder. Some interesting trends from the buoyant US market: Best Buy is betting its future growth on high-end smartphones and emerging connected devices such as 3G laptops. Smartphones are just the launch pad for Best Buy’s broader strategy in taking an early position in the evolving connected terminals space. Wal-Mart is embracing a different route that is aligned with their low-cost mass-market philosophy. The no-frills service plan StraightTalk, developed in conjunction with TracFone, was a big success during the last holiday season. The business is changing in the online channels as well; Amazon launched is beta program last year and connected devices are often sold at significant discounts than through carrier-direct channels. On one hand, third-party specialist retail channels will expand operators' addressable markets to new segments. Operators do not have all the necessary assets to tap the long tail of emerging 3G device segments or new service plans that are aligned more with the consumer electronics industry. In this scenario, retailers are the operators' friend. On the other hand, dilution of operators' direct channels will be a threat for operators' control, and without proper checks in place, the thousands of existing operator stores in the US will soon become much less important. In this scenario, retailers will gain more distribution power and become the operators' foe. - Bonny Joy

February 11, 2010 15:02 Alex Spektor
…Continued from part 1 PC vendors should be worried. It will be impossible to recreate the iPhone’s success. Furthermore the engineering-centric technology and design resources they currently rely on for their legacy products put them at a distinct disadvantage in today’s smartphone market, which is largely driven by engaging user experiences and a complementary set of compelling applications and services. Still, the operator smartphone craze means there is still plenty of room for good devices. Specialists like Dell and Acer can succeed if they prioritize the following issues.image · User Experience – The importance of a top-notch user experience cannot be overemphasized. Be it stock Android with top-shelf hardware, highly customized Android with decent hardware, or something in-between, handsets that provide an engaging experience will eventually make their way into consumers’ hands. · Content and Services – Technology and design will get you noticed, but content and services will get you used by consumers. This is where PC vendors are weakest. They should be proactively forging relationships with content/service providers. Working directly with carriers on on-portal offerings should not be ruled out. In fact, as operators look to drive on-portal usage, PC maker’s willingness to play is a potential differentiator from traditional handset vendors. · Platform Selection – Small vendors should focus on winning platforms. Samsung, with a huge distribution network, strong R&D resources, deep pockets, and dozens of SKUs can afford to support multiple open platforms and develop their own. Inexperienced vendors do not have this luxury. Indeed, platform selection is at the core of the PC-smartphone vendor’s issues, as it dictates the user experience and services capability. The experiences of HP, Asus, Palm and Motorola have shown that Windows Mobile has not been driving vendor success in the consumer smartphone market. Like its European rival Symbian, WinMo failed to evolve to address consumer demands for touchscreen-driven, Web-oriented user experiences. WinMo 7 and Symbian^4 will address these issues, though handsets based on these platforms won’t hit en masse until 2011. If PC vendors want to see meaningful smartphone sales, they need to expand beyond their familiar relationship with Microsoft and consider Android as their primary alternative. Dell has recently re-focused on Android to have a better shot at being consumer-relevant in the broad global market. This focus is necessary to allow PC vendors to concentrate on building the resources and relationships for content and services that are so critical in the mobile world. -Alex Spektor