Wireless Smartphone Strategies

The industry’s most comprehensive set of critical market statistics and qualitative analysis, tracking and reporting on smartphones.

January 17, 2014 19:33 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, the global Tizen smartphone installed base will be a niche proposition in 2014 / 2015. Can Samsung get the new mobile operating system off the ground in places like Japan and Western Europe? Can it avoid a "Bada 2.0" scenario?

This extensive published report, available to clients, forecasts global smartphone sales, by 14 operating systems for 88 countries worldwide, from 2007 to 2018. Almost every major country worldwide is covered, including the United States, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Russia, Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and others.



October 28, 2013 18:06 nmawston

According to the latest research from our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, global smartphone shipments grew 45 percent annually to reach a record 251 million units in the third quarter of 2013. Samsung captured a record 35 percent share of all smartphone volumes worldwide, while Huawei jumped into third place in the rankings.

Global smartphone shipments grew 45 percent annually from 172.8 million units in Q3 2012 to 251.4 million in Q3 2013. This was the first time ever that smartphone shipments exceeded a quarter-billion units in a single quarter. Smartphones accounted for 6 in 10 of all mobile phones shipped worldwide. The smartphone industry’s robust growth is being driven by strong demand for LTE models in developed regions like the US and 3G devices in emerging markets such as China.

Samsung grew 55 percent annually and shipped a record 88.4 million smartphones worldwide, capturing a record 35 percent marketshare in Q3 2013. Samsung shipped over two times more smartphones than Apple during the quarter. While shipments of the flagship Galaxy S4 model softened, solid demand for the new Note 3 phablet and for mass-market devices like the Galaxy Y helped to lift Samsung’s volumes.

Apple shipped 33.8 million iPhones worldwide in Q3 2013, up from 26.9 million a year earlier. Apple grew just 26 percent annually during Q3 2013, which is around half the overall smartphone industry average of 45 percent. Apple’s global smartphone marketshare has dipped noticeably from 16 percent to 13 percent during the past year. Nonetheless, we expect Apple to rebound sharply and regain share in the upcoming fourth quarter of 2013 due to high demand for its new iPhone 5s model.

Huawei was a star performer as global shipments grew 67 percent annually to 12.7 million units in Q3 2013. Huawei captured 5 percent marketshare and became the world’s third largest smartphone vendor. The popular P6 and G610 models have been among the main drivers of Huawei’s success. Huawei remains very strong at home in China, but its position is less robust in other major markets like the US and Europe. Huawei will need to expand aggressively in the American and European markets if it wants to seriously challenge the big two of Samsung and Apple next year.

Other findings from our research include:

LG shipped 12.0 million smartphones worldwide for 5 percent marketshare in Q3 2013. LG grew 71 percent annually, making it the fastest-growing vendor among the top five brands. LG has been expanding rapidly in Europe, but China and India remain weak spots;

Lenovo shipped 10.8 million smartphones worldwide for 4 percent marketshare and fifth position in Q3 2013. Lenovo is popular among mass-market consumers in China and it is expanding internationally. Two of the world’s top five smartphone vendors came from China -- Lenovo and Huawei.


 Exhibit 1: Global Smartphone Vendor Shipments and Market Share in Q3 2013  [1]

Global Smartphone Vendor Shipments (Millions of Units)

Q3 '12

Q3 '13

Samsung

56.9

88.4

Apple

26.9

33.8

Huawei

7.6

12.7

LG

7.0

12.0

Lenovo

6.4

10.8

Others

68.0

93.7

Total

172.8

251.4

 

 

 

Global Smartphone Vendor Marketshare  %

Q3 '12

Q3 '13

Samsung

32.9%

35.2%

Apple

15.6%

13.4%

Huawei

4.4%

5.1%

LG

4.1%

4.8%

Lenovo

3.7%

4.3%

Others

39.4%

37.3%

Total

100.0%

100.0%

 

 

 

Total Growth Year-over-Year %

44.0%

45.5%

 

The full report, Huawei Reaches Third Place as Global Smartphone Shipments Reach Quarter-Billion Units in Q3 2013, is published by the Strategy Analytics Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, details of which can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/bps9qhr.


Please contact Neil Mawston, at nmawston@strategyanalytics.com, for further analysis, data or information.

[1]  Numbers are rounded.


July 17, 2013 13:33 nmawston

According to our Wireless Device Strategies (WDS) service, wearable devices are emerging as a new growth wave for the mobile industry. Companies like Google Glass, Sony, Samsung, Pebble and Jawbone are driving the market. From smart watches to fitness bands to smart glasses, dozens of new models are being launched worldwide.

What are the opportunities and threats for wearables? How big is the market? This published report, available to download by clients, answers those questions and more.


March 28, 2013 14:37 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, smartphone sales volumes will surge +56% in Africa Middle East this year. The rate of growth in Africa is almost two times higher than the global average. Growth will be driven by first-time buyers and 2G handset upgraders in major countries such as Nigeria, Egypt and Saudi Arabia. More details can be viewed by clients in this published report, which forecasts worldwide smartphone sales for 88 countries globally, including Brazil, Spain, Russia and others.


March 28, 2013 14:29 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, smartphone sales volumes will surge +69% in India this year. The rate of growth in India is two times higher than the global average. Growth will be driven by a wave of low-cost Android and Microsoft models for prepaid users from companies like Samsung, Micromax and Nokia. More details can be viewed by clients in this published report, which forecasts worldwide smartphone sales for 88 countries globally, including India, China, US and others.


February 23, 2013 21:53 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, global smartphone shipments grew +38% annually in Q4 2012, and +43% in FY 2012. Growth in the quarter was healthy but slowed a little as postpaid penetration matures. Samsung and Apple continue to dominate volumes due to their extensive retail presence. Huawei became the world's third largest smartphone player for the first time ever, highlighting the rise of Chinese brands. This published report -- available to download by clients --contains global smartphone shipments by the top 20 vendors by region by quarter from 2007 to 2012. Global smartphone shipments by vendor by operating system by quarter are also included in a pivot-table. The report is valuable for mobile stakeholders who want to size the huge market for smartphones and operating system marketshare by hardware vendor.


February 23, 2013 21:44 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, global smartphone shipments reached a record level of 700 million units in full-year 2012. While Android was once more the dominant global OS by volume, Apple reclaimed some marketshare thanks to the first full quarter of availability for the new iPhone 5. This trend was especially apparent in North America, where Android appears to have peaked, but globally Android still accounts for a significant majority of all smartphones shipped. BlackBerry and Symbian continued to see their global presence shrink, and while Microsoft experienced a boost from the launch of Windows Phone 8 in Q4, the gain was smaller than expected.

This published report, available to download by clients, contains global smartphone shipments by operating system by region by quarter from 2009 to 2012. The report is valuable for mobile stakeholders who want to size the huge market for smartphones and operating system marketshare.


February 23, 2013 21:30 nmawston

According to our Wireless Smartphone Strategies (WSS) service, HTC’s smartphone shipments worldwide declined by -29% annually in Q4 2012. We believe Chinese players such as Huawei, ZTE and Lenovo are grabbing large chunks of marketshare in China in the lower price-tiers, while the two smartphone giants Samsung and Apple achieved a lion’s share of volume and profit in the higher-tiers. As a result of the heightened competition, HTC’s global revenues were down -41% against the previous year and its gross profit fell by -92% annually. This published report gives more details for clients to download.


September 5, 2012 18:56 srobinson

Nokia announced the imminent arrival of two new Lumia smartphones at it's New York event today. The Lumia 920 and Lumia 820 devices integrate many of the things that Nokia and Microsoft having been working on during the last 18 months, including Windows Phone 8 operating system, wireless charging, PureView imaging technology and software to deliver some cool camera effects.

In brief, the key hardware specs of the Lumia 920 are:

- DISPLAY: A 4.5-inch display with a capacitive "Super Sensitive Touch" touchscreen interface that can be operated with/without gloves (utilising Synaptic's ClearPad Series 3 technology). The display delivers "PureMotion HD+", which Nokia claims is the best smartphone display technology around, combining greater than 720HD resolution with a very fast refresh rate. It also includes sunlight readability sensors and smart polarisers that change the colours and tones of the display to make it readable in direct sunlight.

- CAMERA: An 8.7MP CMOS sensor with Carl Zeiss optics, combined with Nokia's PureView imaging technology that first appeared in the 41MP Nokia 808 device a few months ago. The Lumia 920 takes excellent photos and HD video even in poor lighting conditions thanks to two key innovations: firstly an aperture of f/2.0 which allows an enormous amount of light to be captured and allows the use of a large silicon sensor in a thin form factor; and secondly floating lens technology that provides image stabilisation and allows the shutter to stay open longer without creating blurred images. Nokia claims that the Lumia 920 captures 5 to 10 times the amount of light that other cameraphones capture. The key to the image stabilisation feature is tiny springs that are mounted on the whole camera module, not just on the lens.

- BATTERY: The Lumia 920 is powered by a massive (for Nokia) 2000 mAh Li-Ion battery, but the main innovation here is the integration of wireless charging using the Wireless Power Consortium's "Qi" standard. This is a big boost for Qi and the WPC as Nokia brings other partners to the market too, including Virgin Atlantic and the Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, who will have charging stations in their business lounges and coffee tables respectively. This will hopefully propel Qi forward to create a single standard, increasing compatibility and reducing fragmentation in the wireless charging landscape.

- PROCESSOR: Qualcomm's 1.5GHz Dual-core Snapdragon S4 processor, MSM8960, is at the heart of the Lumia 920. It's a low-power, high-performance processor built on the leading-edge 28nm process node, delivering a stutter-free user experience and long(er) battery life. The modem in the MSM8960 supports 5 LTE bands and 4 HSPDA bands. Qualcomm's stranglehold on the Windows ecosystem is now in its third year of exclusivity.

- MEMORY: 32GB NAND Flash. Nothing sensational here and no memory card slot despite WP8 now supporting removable memory. Also, only one memory capacity option, unlike some of Nokia's competitors who offer higher memory capacity options for an extra $100, over 90% of which is pure profit. Has Nokia missed a trick here?

The Lumia 820 has some subtle differences:

- DISPLAY: 4.3 inch AMOLED display with 480x800 resolution, compared with the Lumia 920's 4.5-inch IPS-TFT with 720x1280 resolution.

- CAMERA: Same resolution 8MP main camera, but an aperture of f/2.2, compared with 8MP f/2.0 on the Lumia 920.

- BATTERY: A smaller 1650mAh battery. Still with wireless charging, this time in an exchangeable shell!

- PROCESSOR: Same.

- MEMORY: 8GB embedded NAND FLASH plus a microSDHC card slot supporting up to 32GB external memory, compared with the Lumia 920's 32GB and no slot.

The Lumia 920 is the culmination and integration of technology that has appeared in multiple Nokia devices recently. It takes the best of the Lumia 900's large display size, with the aesthetically pleasing curved display on the Lumia 800 and the incredible camera technology on the Symbian-based 808 PureView and mixes them up with some cutting-edge new image stabilisation camera technology, 4G LTE support, NFC, wireless charging and of course Windows Phone 8 .... Not bad Nokia!

Read the first impressions from our User Experience Practice of the Lumia 920's appeal to smartphone users here - Will Consumers Switch OS to get a Nokia Lumia Windows Phone 8?

- Stuart Robinson


January 12, 2011 21:17 Alex Spektor

After years of public speculation, AT&T has finally lost its US exclusive on Apple’s megastar smartphone. As consumers prepare for the arrival of the Verizon Wireless (VZW) iPhone, we address some questions about the impact of this development.

Just how many iPhones will they sell?clip_image002

AT&T customers bought an average of around 4 million iPhones per quarter in 2010. Even if VZW achieves a conservative half of that run rate, it could mean 8 million CDMA iPhones shipped domestically in the first year. In addition to newcomers from other carriers, buyers will include existing subscribers, whose contracts will steadily come up for renewal over the next two years.

Of course, no longer the only option for iOS enthusiasts, AT&T volumes of the iPhone are likely to suffer this year. We can reference the end of iPhone exclusivity in Western Europe for an example of what may happen. As our Handset Country Share Tracker service shows, Apple’s peak share at exclusive carrier O2 UK was 10%. By the time the phone was also introduced at Vodafone and Orange, Apple’s share was roughly just 5-6% with each carrier.

Thus, while Apple’s total volumes are going to benefit as a result of this week’s announcement, neither carrier should expect to see the iPhone account for anywhere near the huge 70% of smartphone volumes that AT&T recorded in Q3 2010.

What impact will the network have?

Aside from a revised radio section and some cosmetic tweaks, the availability of a Wi-Fi hotspot feature is the only official new feature of the VZW iPhone. But AT&T defectors may find one other difference – the inability to simultaneously use voice and data on a CDMA network. As Droid users know, Wi-Fi data access can be used as a limited substitute, but expect outcries of a “lesser” experience from some frustrated buyers. Of course, the inevitable LTE iPhone (in 2012, perhaps?) will eventually equalize this matter.

Unlike AT&T, VZW does not have a bandwidth cap on its US$30/month plan. AT&T’s US$25/month plan provides just 2GB, which protects the carrier’s pipes from overloading, but prevents carefree use of compelling, but bandwidth-hogging apps like NetFlix. Coupled with broad perception that VZW is more reliable, it could mean an upside for the phone’s new carrier. However, we can expect AT&T to send a heavy message about its HSPA network being faster than its competitor’s EV-DO Rev. A.

How will this impact the competition?

AT&T has been preparing for the loss of exclusivity since at least early last year, adding a broad range of Android (and later Windows Phone 7) models. Expect an onslaught of high-end Android handsets (such as the Motorola Atrix 4G) to quickly replace lost iPhone volumes at AT&T, benefitting the likes of Samsung and HTC.

Meanwhile, VZW’s strong Droid brand of Google-phones is likely to take a hit. VZW subscribers looking for a less complex experience than Android’s will find the iPhone to be a gem, cannibalizing the carrier’s own volumes. The real impact, however, will be felt by RIM. The BlackBerry portfolio still lacks a solid full-screen touchphone, and unless the Canadian vendor comes up with one soon, it stands to lose further share with VZW.

-Alex Spektor

USA Smartphone OS Marketshare by Operator: Q3 2010

Global Smartphone Sales Forecast by Operating System: 2002 to 2015