Handset Country Share Tracker

A vital tracking tool for helping companies measure the success of competitors and partners in their local markets.

November 26, 2014 18:06 khyers

In three new reports Strategy Analytics Handset Country Share Tracker service examines the Q3 2014 handset vendor landscape for three of Western Europe's most important markets.  Each of these reports provide detailed views of the leading handset vendors and how they did in terms of handset shipments, growth, and how they performed with each of the key operators in each of these countries.

The French handset market grew by +1% against the same period one year ago, in keeping with the longer-term trend of slightly sluggish growth in the country. Among the vendors Samsung and Apple retained its top two spots while Samsung went through annual handset shipments decline and Apple grew YoY. This report tracks handset vendor market share at the four major French operators -- Orange, SFR, Bouygues Telecom and Free Mobile -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

The German handset market shrank by -1% year-on-year in Q3 2014, continuing the longer-term trend of slightly slowing growth in the country. Among the vendors Samsung continued to retain its number one spot, but lost its annual market share a bit. Apple managed to keep its no.2 position for the eighth sequential quarter. Meanwhile Nokia, Sony and LG continued to compete for no.3 position. HTC didn't manage to grow its market share YoY while Motorola inched up its share every quarter by degrees. This report tracks quarterly handset vendor market share at the four major German operators -- T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2 and E-Plus -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

We estimate 9.1 million handsets were shipped in the UK in Q3 2014, remaining flat versus the year-ago quarter, impacted by sluggish operator subsidies and the overall growth pause of its handset markets. The UK handset market had been trending flat at best on an annual basis since 2010, and the first three quarters of 2014 experienced -1% YoY decline in spite of the deployment of next generation 4G LTE networks across the country's major operators and a general macroeconomic up-tick. This report tracks quarterly handset vendor market share at the four major UK operators -- EE, Vodafone, O2 and Three -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

Each of these reports are important tools for measuring the health of individual handset brands at the operator level.


September 5, 2014 05:38 woh

According to our latest UK handset vendor share by operators report -- published by our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) service -- Motorola is showing robust signs of resurrection at major operators in the UK, including O2, Vodafone and Everything Everwhere in Q2 2014, mainly boosted by the growing sales of its affordable Moto G and Moto E line-ups. Motorola is providing these appealing products at relatively competitive price-points through diverse channels from operators to open retailers. If Motorola's emerging success in Western Europe continues in the coming months (even if the face of Apple's new "iPhone 6" range), it will be sure to make Lenovo, the potential new owner, maintain Motorola's brand for the Western European market ahead of their own.

In addition to the UK, Motorola is also enjoying steadily increasing marketshare in other major Western European countries like Germany and France, which our HCST service also covers. These three reports for UK, Germany and France can be viewed at our HCST service website, and are available to clients.

 


October 11, 2013 14:24 khyers

Strategy Analytics' Handset Country Share Tracker service reports Gemany handset vendor marketshare by operator for Q2 2013. The German handset market grew by 2% year-on-year in Q2 2013, reversing the declining trend of the previous two quarters. Among the vendors Samsung comfortably cemented its number one spot, but Apple experienced its customary seasonal dip in advance of the anticipated launch of new iPhones in Q3. This report tracks quarterly handset vendor market share at the four major German operators -- T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2 and E-Plus -- from Q1 2009 to Q1 2013. The report, available to clients, is an important tool for measuring the health of individual handset brands at the operator level.


March 23, 2013 02:41 nmawston

According to our Handset Country Share Tracker (CST) service, the German mobile phone market slipped by -8% year-on-year in Q4 2012, as the broader ongoing macroeconomic challenges affecting the whole of the eurozone trumped the relative strength of the German economy. Following the launch of the iPhone 5, Apple reclaimed a significant chunk of volumes in Germany, but there are also initial signs of traction for Nokia's Lumia Windows Phone family.  The Finnish vendor gained 1 point of sequential marketshare in the quarter. This published report, available to clients, tracks quarterly mobile vendor market share at the four major German operators -- T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2 and E-Plus -- from Q1 2009 to Q4 2012. The report is an important tool for measuring the health of individual handset brands at the operator level in Western Europe's second largest cellphone market.


March 23, 2013 02:31 nmawston

According to our Handset Country Share Tracker (CST) service, the UK mobile phone market dipped -4% year-on-year in Q4 2012, mimicking the broader economic challenges of the country. While Samsung and Apple showed healthy growth, this was offset by declines from Nokia, RIM, HTC and the Android long-tail. This published report, available to clients, tracks mobile phone vendor shipments and marketshare at the 4 major UK operators -- O2, Vodafone, Everything Everywhere and Three -- from Q1 2009 to Q4 2012. The report is an important tool for measuring the health of individual device brands at the operator level in Western Europe's largest cellphone market.


May 7, 2010 17:05 nmawston

The big two Chinese vendors, Huawei and ZTE, have initially focused their handset activities on emerging markets, such as ChIndia, Africa and Latin America. Enabled by MediaTek, Qualcomm and Via chipsets, the two handset brands have achieved solid shipment growth in GSM and CDMA since 2007. Both vendors will ship tens of millions of units in emerging markets this year, mostly for low-end prepaid users, giving them a base for scale and buying power. This is phase 1.

Phase 2 of their growth targets mature regions, such as Western Europe and the US. ZTE and Huawei are using their success in emerging markets as a springboard to attack developed markets. The Chinese rightly believe carriers are king in developed countries, and they are quietly partnering with a growing number of the biggest players to deliver carrier-branded hardware. Vodafone recently unveiled 8 new Vodafone-branded models across low-, mid- and high-tiers for its European markets, 6 of which are manufactured by ZTE and Huawei. For example, the Vodafone 845 3G touch-smartphone with Android 2.1 is built by Huawei. The Vodafone 547 EDGE touchphone is made by ZTE. In the US, Huawei made the popular mid-tier Tap touchphone for T Mobile. Carriers like the cost-competitiveness and flexible customization offered by the Chinese brands, and they are useful alternatives to the European, American and Asian vendors such as HTC.

Phase 3 will eventually require a more-complex five-pronged strategy to defend against existing or potential new competitors in the operator-branded handset industry such as Sagem or  Foxconn. Huawei and ZTE will need to upgrade their companies’ competences in:

1. branding;

2. industrial design;

3. portfolio management for build-to-plan products;

4. software usability;

5. content and services.

For now, both Chinese vendors are happy to provide 3G handsets mostly as a delivery tool for operator services. For example, the Vodafone 845 from Huawei is optimized for Vodafone 360 services. But ZTE and Huawei will arguably struggle to sustainably differentiate their own brands on pricing and hardware alone. Developing a software and services (S&S) strategy beyond hardware will therefore become an important value-add for Chinese vendors to attract and retain affluent users in mature regions. An S&S strategy will subsequently open up opportunities for Chinese services brands to partner with ZTE and Huawei to showcase their products in new markets abroad. We have a Google phone and a Microsoft phone; how about a Baidu phone?


April 14, 2010 17:04 Alex Spektor

After months of industry-wide speculation about Microsoft’s “Project Pink,” the software giant recently unveiled two phones: Kin One and Kin Two. Manufactured by Sharp (the maker of most T-Mobile Sidekick phones, in partnership with Danger, whom Microsoft purchased in late 2008), the phones will ship with specs found on many of today’s smartphones: capacitive touchscreens, QWERTY, high-megapixel cameras, gigabytes of flash memory, Bluetooth, GPS, accelerometers – the list goes on. Yet, the Kins are not true smartphones, as there is no application support. Rather, the Kin family of products consists of cleverly targeted feature phones.

While the smartphone segment is growing steadily, the wireless industry is certainly not done with feature phones, which we expect to account for approximately two-thirds of handsets sold in North America this year. Earlier this year, AT&T announced intentions to give significant attention to the mid-range, messaging-centric feature phone category, which the operator calls Quick Messaging Devices (QMD).

At Verizon Wireless (who, along with Vodafone in Europe, will soon carry the Microsoft phones), the Kin will make an interesting replacement to aging handsets like LG’s enV series. In a way, the Kin family is part of VZW’s answer to AT&T’s QMD category. Expect VZW and Microsoft to back a heavy advertising campaign when the phones come out, promoting the novel user experience and social networking functions. With a low retail price and some innovation on data plan pricing (see the Nokia Nuron smartphone, which requires just US$10/month for unlimited data at T-Mobile USA), the two Kin models could drive strong volumes for the carrier.

 

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For Microsoft, who recently painted themselves into a high-end corner with hefty hardware requirements on Windows Phone 7, the Kin family represents an interesting platform framework to get closer to the youth segment.

The high-tier Windows Phone 7 will be a natural handset upgrade path for today’s Kin user, as both platforms are forming common elements. While the short-term goal with the Kin family is to expand the addressable market by bringing messaging/social networking services through a robust framework, the long term goal is to own the consumer by highlighting the Microsoft value proposition to him/her early on.

Either way, Kin provides an interesting glimpse into Microsoft’s understanding of the future handset market, where feature phones will rely heavily on the cloud. (Like its Sidekick predecessors, the Kins store user data and content on company servers.) Add to that Windows Live service and Zune content integration, and Microsoft can be seen as gradually ramping up its strength on the multi-screen index.

-Alex Spektor