Handset Country Share Tracker

A vital tracking tool for helping companies measure the success of competitors and partners in their local markets.

April 2, 2014 16:36 sbicheno

Chinese smartphone specialist Xiaomi recruited the former head of Google’s mobile products business - Hugo Barra - to become the new head of its international operations last year. Having taken a few months to find his feet, Barra has recently been on a publicity offensive with Xiaomi’s planned international expansion the theme.

Right now Xiaomi sells competitively-price Android smartphones within China, which contain software and services aimed specifically at Chinese consumers. But Barra has said that within two years he expects Xiaomi to have a portfolio of mobile products that can be used anywhere in the world, which will be the bedrock of the company’s global expansion starting with other Asian markets such as Malaysia and India.

Recent unconfirmed reports have Xiaomi setting new records for unit shipments in Q1 2014 so it looks like the company has momentum on its side. But, as other Chinese OEMs have found, strong domestic sales are in no way a sign of success internationally. Our Country Share Tracker (CST) service believes Barra will need to use all the knowledge and skill acquired at Google to ensure Xiaomi is viewed as a genuine alternative to the many other Android vendors currently operating on a global level.


February 25, 2014 07:27 woh

According to a recently published handset and smartphone marketshare report for 15 countries in Q4 2013, released to clients through our Country Share Tracker (CST) service, Samsung and Apple are the only two vendors who seized the top spots across 15 major countries worldwide. Samsung captured the number one spot in most countries, including China, India and Brazil, while Apple ranked first in North America and Japan due to solid demand for the new iPhone 5s. In Japan, Apple captured a record share of all smartphones shipped during the quarter, crushing local vendors like Fujitsu and Panasonic and giant Samsung.


November 12, 2013 18:00 sbicheno

China smartphone shipments surged +91% year-on-year to record levels in Q3 2013. While Samsung remained in first place, Lenovo and Coolpad are hot on its heels in second and third positions and Xiaomi pushed into the top 5 list for the first time ever. The Chinese domestic smartphone market is increasingly influencing the overall global picture, and subscribers to Strategy Analytics’ Country Share Tracker service can access full quarterly Chinese device shipments, broken down by device type, vendor and OS, here.


November 11, 2013 18:06 nmawston

According to our Country Share Tracker (CST) service -- in a newly published report called China Smartphone Vendor and OS Marketshare : Q3 2013 -- China smartphone shipments surged a huge +91% YoY to record levels in Q3 2013.

China maintained its position as the largest smartphone market worldwide since Q3 2011. Today, smartphone shipments account for 86% of total handset volumes in China, up from 59% one year ago.

Samsung remained in first place in China, while Lenovo and Coolpad maintained second and third positions.

Xiaomi was the star performer in Q3 2013, pushing into the top-5 list in China for the first time since Xiaomi began operations in 2011. Strong performances in e-commerce channels, and the launch of the more-affordable Hongmi phone, were the key drivers behind its surging volumes. More analysis on Xiaomi and China smartphones can be downloaded by clients here.



July 22, 2013 13:04 nmawston

Motorola has recently been sending out invites to the launch of its new, flagship Moto X smartphone in the US, due in August 2013.

Our Country Share Tracker (CST) service expects Moto X volumes to be tilted mostly toward the United States market in the near-term (e.g. AT&T). We expect the pricing and promotion strategy to be heavily supported by parent Google. Moto X will attempt to differentiate from rivals by hardware materials and software customization. Moto X will compete with Samsung S3 / S4, HTC One, and other models. We expect the point-of-sale marketing for Moto X to have a strong “made at home in America” slant to it. Whether Samsung, HTC, LG and other Android partners will be pleased by this new Googorola LTE smartphone push remains to be seen.

Will Moto X revive Motorola in Q4 2013? It will give Motorola a lift, for sure, but the device is fairly "small beer" for now -- and it has a long way to go before it can compete with the kinds of volumes generated by the world's best-selling smartphone models, such as Apple iPhone 5 or Samsung S3.


March 6, 2013 07:22 woh

Global smartphone shipments increased by 38% annually in Q4 2012. This report, available to the clients of our Country Handset Share Tracker service, tracks the world's 11 leading smartphone vendors' shipments and marketshare across 15 major countries worldwide in Q1-Q4 2012. The 15 countries tracked account for 80% of total global smartphone volumes. Countries covered are: Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, UK, and the United States. This report is a valuable tool for any mobile stakeholder that wants to track smartphone vendors' operational performances at a granular country level.


September 27, 2012 17:34 Alex Spektor

According to Strategy Analytics’ Country Share Tracker (CST) service, 15 countries represented three-quarters of global smartphone shipments in Q2 2012: Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Spain, UK, and USA. During the quarter, Samsung was the number one smartphone vendor in 13 of these countries. Meanwhile, Apple captured the top spot in the United States, desipite early anticipation of the recently released iPhone 5. Indeed, Samsung and Apple have separated themselves from the rest of the pack, as the ony two smartphone vendors with double-digit marketshare worldiwde. More smartphone vendor shipments to 15 key countries worldwide in Q2 2012 can be viewed by clients here.


June 4, 2010 19:06 Neil Shah
The global handset industry continues to grow and fragment. Due to platform facilitators like MediaTek, manufacturing a 2G cellphone is easier than ever. These trends have led to the emergence of a long tail of dozens of microvendors, mostly from China and India. Numerous microvendors have benefitted from the surging demand for low-cost 2G phones in rural and suburban markets. According to our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) report for Asia, leading microvendors Micromax and Tianyu are ranked among the top 6 brands in their domestic markets of India and China. What have been the main reasons for the microvendors' growth? • OEM-partnered low-cost handset solutions; • Strong ultra-low- and entry-level portfolios at very competitive price-points; • Innovative features for local needs and tastes, such as 30-day standby battery (important feature for regular electricity deprived rural markets), torch-light, theft tracker, multimedia player, video call, AM/FM Radio and dual-SIM; • Extensive retail distribution footprints; • Aggressive advertising and brand promotions; The microvendors have gone after first-time and second-time buyers and emerged with some success. However, key questions that arise are -- how many microvendors are successfully selling and how have they originated? Is there any major differentiation between their offerings? How are the microvendors positioning their brands? What are the microvendors doing in order to compete at the next level, such as 3G smartphones? Thus, starting in Q1 2010, we are now actively tracking an additional 25 emerging microvendors every quarter. These top 25 microvendors have captured a combined 4% global marketshare. Micromax and Spice top our rankings, which include other vendors from diverse industries such as consumer electronics and personal computing. We expect the long tail of Asian vendors will remain active for the foreseeable future, as they focus their efforts on a next wave of emerging 3G handset growth in 2011. Our published Microvendors report for Q1 2010 is available to download for clients here.

May 20, 2010 21:05 David Kerr

sa photo dk

 

May you live in interesting times as the old Chinese proverb goes. Well in the information, communication and entertainment industry we certainly do. Some very interesting questions face our industry whether we look at:

  • the outcome of much delayed Indian 3G auction or
  • the battlegrounds around HSPA+ and LTE or
  • the surging Android ecosystem vs. weakening Symbian or
  • the upside potential for WebOS under it new owners
  • the potential disruption caused by mobile cloud phones and device

Every major technology advancement has lead to a massive disruption in the handset and infrastructure vendor community.

  • In 3G, Motorola’s slim myopia led to its near ruin and has provided huge growth for Samsung and a foothold in international markets for LG and SEMC.
  • On the infrastructure side 3G was expertly grasped by Huawei and ZTE leading to a new wave of M & A and a new world order which counts Nortel as a victim and seriously challenges ALU.

So how will the migration to 4G change the playing field?

  • Who will benefit most on the operator/service provider side?
  • Will Cloud Phones be disruptive in LTE?
  • Will operators find a path to realign the traffic/revenue mix with mobile broadband devices?

I would welcome your thoughts on these key questions. Also don’t forget to join our client webinar on Thursday May 27.

 

David


May 7, 2010 17:05 nmawston

The big two Chinese vendors, Huawei and ZTE, have initially focused their handset activities on emerging markets, such as ChIndia, Africa and Latin America. Enabled by MediaTek, Qualcomm and Via chipsets, the two handset brands have achieved solid shipment growth in GSM and CDMA since 2007. Both vendors will ship tens of millions of units in emerging markets this year, mostly for low-end prepaid users, giving them a base for scale and buying power. This is phase 1.

Phase 2 of their growth targets mature regions, such as Western Europe and the US. ZTE and Huawei are using their success in emerging markets as a springboard to attack developed markets. The Chinese rightly believe carriers are king in developed countries, and they are quietly partnering with a growing number of the biggest players to deliver carrier-branded hardware. Vodafone recently unveiled 8 new Vodafone-branded models across low-, mid- and high-tiers for its European markets, 6 of which are manufactured by ZTE and Huawei. For example, the Vodafone 845 3G touch-smartphone with Android 2.1 is built by Huawei. The Vodafone 547 EDGE touchphone is made by ZTE. In the US, Huawei made the popular mid-tier Tap touchphone for T Mobile. Carriers like the cost-competitiveness and flexible customization offered by the Chinese brands, and they are useful alternatives to the European, American and Asian vendors such as HTC.

Phase 3 will eventually require a more-complex five-pronged strategy to defend against existing or potential new competitors in the operator-branded handset industry such as Sagem or  Foxconn. Huawei and ZTE will need to upgrade their companies’ competences in:

1. branding;

2. industrial design;

3. portfolio management for build-to-plan products;

4. software usability;

5. content and services.

For now, both Chinese vendors are happy to provide 3G handsets mostly as a delivery tool for operator services. For example, the Vodafone 845 from Huawei is optimized for Vodafone 360 services. But ZTE and Huawei will arguably struggle to sustainably differentiate their own brands on pricing and hardware alone. Developing a software and services (S&S) strategy beyond hardware will therefore become an important value-add for Chinese vendors to attract and retain affluent users in mature regions. An S&S strategy will subsequently open up opportunities for Chinese services brands to partner with ZTE and Huawei to showcase their products in new markets abroad. We have a Google phone and a Microsoft phone; how about a Baidu phone?