Handset Country Share Tracker

A vital tracking tool for helping companies measure the success of competitors and partners in their local markets.

November 26, 2014 18:06 khyers

In three new reports Strategy Analytics Handset Country Share Tracker service examines the Q3 2014 handset vendor landscape for three of Western Europe's most important markets.  Each of these reports provide detailed views of the leading handset vendors and how they did in terms of handset shipments, growth, and how they performed with each of the key operators in each of these countries.

The French handset market grew by +1% against the same period one year ago, in keeping with the longer-term trend of slightly sluggish growth in the country. Among the vendors Samsung and Apple retained its top two spots while Samsung went through annual handset shipments decline and Apple grew YoY. This report tracks handset vendor market share at the four major French operators -- Orange, SFR, Bouygues Telecom and Free Mobile -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

The German handset market shrank by -1% year-on-year in Q3 2014, continuing the longer-term trend of slightly slowing growth in the country. Among the vendors Samsung continued to retain its number one spot, but lost its annual market share a bit. Apple managed to keep its no.2 position for the eighth sequential quarter. Meanwhile Nokia, Sony and LG continued to compete for no.3 position. HTC didn't manage to grow its market share YoY while Motorola inched up its share every quarter by degrees. This report tracks quarterly handset vendor market share at the four major German operators -- T-Mobile, Vodafone, O2 and E-Plus -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

We estimate 9.1 million handsets were shipped in the UK in Q3 2014, remaining flat versus the year-ago quarter, impacted by sluggish operator subsidies and the overall growth pause of its handset markets. The UK handset market had been trending flat at best on an annual basis since 2010, and the first three quarters of 2014 experienced -1% YoY decline in spite of the deployment of next generation 4G LTE networks across the country's major operators and a general macroeconomic up-tick. This report tracks quarterly handset vendor market share at the four major UK operators -- EE, Vodafone, O2 and Three -- from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.

Each of these reports are important tools for measuring the health of individual handset brands at the operator level.


November 21, 2014 14:18 khyers

After several quarters of declining or flat growth, handset shipments in the United States improved on a sequential and annual basis during Q3 2014. Apple and Samsung remain the top two brands, but they are at risk of losing traction to a resurgent LG and bullish ZTE at multiple carriers like AT&T. Meanwhile, HTC and Blackberry continued to struggle, due to weak portfolios. T Mobile was the standout operator, as its share of handset volumes is now at the highest level for four years.

The report USA Handset Vendor Marketshare by Operators Q3 2014 examines the performance of the key handset vendors in this key market. This extensive report tracks mobile handset shipments and vendor marketshare for 16 major vendors at the "big 4" operators in the United States on a quarterly basis from Q1 2009 to Q3 2014.  The report is available for clients of our Handset Country Share Tracker service.


November 14, 2014 01:25 woh

According to the recently published 'Global Handset Vendor Share in 15 Countries in Q3 2014', published under our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) service, Micromax ranks no.2 in handset market in India during Q3 2014, closing the gap against the leading vendor, Samsung. The market share difference between those two got narrowed to a record-low level in Q3 2014.

Asus, the Taiwanese handset vendor and better known for its laptop, desktop and server products, is slowly but meaningfully enhancing its handset market presence in several key countries including China, India and its home Taiwanese market based on its Zenfone and Padfone series. As this vendor is also aggressively shipping its handsets into other big markets such as Russia, Brazil, Turkey, Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand, it is expected that Asus is sure to keep up its handset market share in those countries in coming quarters.

The detailed analysis and marekt share on the 23 leading handset vendors in major 15 countries can be available to our paid clients, at this link.


November 12, 2014 08:39 woh

According to the recently published 'Global Smartphone Vendor Share for 15 Countries' under our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) service, Samsung captured the biggest smartphone market share in 11 countries out of 15 countries that we track every quarter. Apple became the no. 1 smartphone vendor in 3 countries including the US and Japan while Xiaomi became the largest smartphone vendor in China for the first time during Q3 2014.

The report, which tracks the leading 17 smartphone vendors, from tier-one vendors such as Samsung and Apple, to the rising vendors such as Oppo, Vivo and Gionee, in major 15 coutries acorss the globe can be available to our paid clients at this link.


July 10, 2013 04:04 woh

With global smartphone shipments increasing the market share in developed and developing markets in Q1 2013, we estimate the top 10 smartphone model families accounted for almost five out of seven smartphones shipped worldwide during the quarter.

Our Handset Country Share Tracker (HCST) service are tracking the quartery global shipments of top 35 well-known and well-received smartphone models from Samsung (Galaxy), Apple (iPhone), LG (Optimus), Nokia(Lumia), Blackberry (BB10), HTC (One), Motorola (Razr) and the rising Chinese vendors including Huawei, ZTE, Lenovo and Xiaomi from Q1 2011 to Q1 2013 in this published report.


March 12, 2013 15:36 nmawston

Analysts from our Country Share Tracker (CST) service will be attending the launch of Samsung's new Galaxy S4 flagship smartphone in New York, USA, on Thursday 14th March, 2013.

What do we expect to see?

Hardware: A 5-inch, multicore, LTE slate with upgraded materials and enhanced battery life.

Software: The latest version of Android. Improved eye-tracking. Better touch.

Services: More use of Hubs, such as Readers Hub. Jazzier maps. More support for NFC.

Pricing will be iPhone-like.

Subsidies from carriers in the US and worldwide will be high.

Above all, Samsung must be mindful NOT to do or say anything "bad". Apple lost heartshare when it mislaunched Maps alongside the iPhone 5 last year. Samsung must not replicate Apple's strategic misstep.

Will the S4 be good enough to catch the iPhone 5 as the world's best-selling smartphone model in 2013?


November 8, 2012 09:22 nmawston

According to new research from our Country Share Tracker (CST) service, Samsung’s Galaxy S3 overtook Apple’s iPhone 4S to become the world’s best-selling smartphone model for the first time ever in the third quarter of 2012. A large touchscreen, extensive distribution and generous operator subsidies have propelled the Galaxy S3 to the top spot.

Samsung’s Galaxy S3 smartphone model shipped 18.0 million units worldwide during the third quarter of 2012. The Galaxy S3 captured an impressive 11 percent share of all smartphones shipped globally and it has become the world’s best-selling smartphone model for the first time ever. A large touchscreen design, extensive distribution across dozens of countries, and generous operator subsidies have been among the main causes of the Galaxy S3’s success. Apple shipped an estimated 16.2 million iPhone 4S units worldwide for second place, as consumers temporarily held off purchases in anticipation of a widely expected iPhone 5 upgrade at the end of the quarter.

Samsung’s Galaxy S3 has proven wildly popular with consumers and operators across North America, Europe and Asia. However, the Galaxy S3’s position as the world’s best-selling smartphone model is likely to be short-lived. The Apple iPhone 5 has gotten off to a solid start already with an estimated 6.0 million units shipped globally during Q3 2012. We expect the new iPhone 5 to out-ship Samsung’s Galaxy S3 in the coming fourth quarter of 2012 and Apple should soon reclaim the title of the world’s most popular smartphone model.

Exhibit 1: Global Smartphone Shipments & Marketshare by Model in Q3 2012 [1]

Global Smartphone Shipments by Model (Millions of Units)

Q2 '12

Q3 '12

Samsung Galaxy S3

5.4

18.0

Apple iPhone 4S

19.4

16.2

Apple iPhone 5

0.0

6.0

Others

128.0

127.6

Total

152.8

167.8

 

 

 

Global Smartphone Marketshare by Model (% of Total)

Q2 '12

Q3 '12

Samsung Galaxy S3

3.5%

10.7%

Apple iPhone 4S

12.7%

9.7%

Apple iPhone 5

0.0%

3.6%

Others

83.8%

76.0%

Total

100.0%

100.0%


[1] Numbers are rounded. Updated total. The Samsung Galaxy S3 total does not include the S3 Mini, S2, S or any other related models. The iPhone 4S total does not include the iPhone 5, iPhone 4 or any other related models.


August 4, 2010 23:08 nmawston


Blackberry has finally introduced its much-awaited OS 6 upgrade with the launch of the Torch 3G smartphone. It will initially be sold exclusively at AT&T in the USA in August 2010, giving the operator an alternative to the iPhone. OS 6 employs a Webkit engine, HTML5 support and universal search. The Torch is a QWERTY slider with a 3-inch HVGA+ touchscreen optimized for messaging and media prosumers. Can the Torch outshine Apple? Is it an Android killer?




Well, the external design is a little unexciting. It looks not dissimilar to the Palm Pre. The hardware-list ticks the right boxes for a premium handset -- with 802.11n, 5MP camera, and so on -- but the 624MHz Marvell processor might be perceived as sluggish compared with the emerging tide of 1GHz superphones. The software-list looks good, with Flash, HTML5 support and Webkit for developers. The Webkit-rendered browser will compress data traffic, benefitting AT&T's stressed network. RIM has opened up the platform a little for a better developer environment. Data services are prosumer-friendly and consumer-friendly and primed for email, Internet-browsing, social networking, instant messaging, maps, WiFi geolocation, universal search, RSS feeds, media playback, Blackberry World and PC tethering. No head-to-head videophony, though.

Navigation of the UI is delivered through 3 main interfaces; touchscreen, trackpad and hard-QWERTY keyboard. Our brief trial of the handset in New York recently found the user-experience to be generally satisfying with a responsive touchscreen and good discoverability for apps and services. Retail pricing will be set initially at US$199 postpaid with a two-year contract. This is just in the sweetspot zone for high-end users, and it indicates AT&T will be subsidizing the Torch to the tune of roughly US$200 per unit.

So... are OS 6, Blackberry World and the Torch an Android killer? No. The overall package of hardware, software and services lacks a true wow factor. The Torch helps RIM to close the gap on Android models and iPhone, but it does not overtake them. Is the Torch a Blackberry savior? Maybe. Torch 1 is a solid step in the right direction to stemming churn by upgrading its touchphone portfolio. Torch 2 and Torch 3 will need to be even better, though, with improvements like a 2GHz processor, because the consumer-enterprise handset market in the US has become hyper-competitive and the Torch will not be a leading light for long.


June 11, 2010 18:06 Alex Spektor
Bluetooth profile implementation in handsets is a pretty dry subject. But with Bluetooth capability available in six out of every ten handsets sold worldwide this year, the subject is an important one for product planners. clip_image002Even the savviest consumers likely only know to look for a few key profiles when buying a phone. A2DP is one that has received some attention, as it allow the delivery of stereo music to Bluetooth headphones or Bluetooth-capable vehicles. According to our latest forecast, A2DP support will be found in three-quarters of all Bluetooth phones sold this year. Another profile, AVRCP, was designed to allow Bluetooth devices to remotely control each other. The Bluetooth SIG’s example is an outdated scenario, where a PC controls a supposedly Bluetooth-capable VCR. However, where AVRCP really shines is as a companion to A2DP. A common usage scenario is in the vehicle, where a consumer can listen to music through the speakers (A2DP) and change tracks via the car’s controls (AVRCP). I can say from personal experience that at least one user was delighted to learn that he could advance tracks streaming to his BlackBerry’s Pandora client via the car’s steering wheel. The potential impact on stickiness is quite powerful when a handset feature can delight a user. PBAP is a profile that still has fairly low penetration around the globe (the highest is in Western Europe, by the way), but it will experience strong growth in the coming years. The profile allows the transfer of phonebook data to other devices (e.g., to an in-vehicle display). Carmakers, such as BMW, Ford, and Nissan, are increasingly supporting PBAP in their vehicles, and this trend should give long-term uplift to the profile’s penetration in handsets. Not all profile implementations were “created equal,” however, and simply having a profile does not necessarily mean that it will work as expected. Apple, for example, supports AVRCP on its iPhone, but it does not support audio track advancement, which is surprising for such a media-capable device. The inconsistency of implementation among vendors can be a disappointment and a point of frustration to users. The lack of consumer awareness of Bluetooth profiles and their benefits remains an issue for the technology, largely because of cryptic, unmarketable names. Perhaps key industry players could rally toward using more intuitive names (e.g., “In-Car Audio Control”) to help illustrate use cases and engage consumers. Ultimately, we expect handset vendors to prioritize the profiles that drive stickiness and can be directly associated with carrier ARPU. This can mean simply enabling in-vehicle calling with profiles like HFP or even, ultimately, helping to link the phone to a multi-platform connected device framework. Bluetooth Phone Sales by Profile -Alex Spektor

March 22, 2010 21:03 Neil Shah
With Q3 FY 2010 financial report released this week and the outlook is still gloomy for Palm, it is being titled as a candidate for a “potential” buyout. But the future is in its own hands, and for the company like Palm it still has enough potential to weather out of this state and see some sunlight. There are some key areas where Palm has to rework its strategy. Palm has a good product line with likes of Palm Pre Plus & Palm Pixi Plus, and powered by a striking Linux core webOS platform enabling an intuitive UI covering all the basic traits to suit the targeted North American market. But still it’s unable to leverage on this appealing product line. The major issue for this lacklustre performance is due to its competition against the smartphone giants- Apple with a richer user experience and sea of applications, Samsung & LG growth with their manufacturing strategy customizing to satisfy mobile operator’s market segments, Blackberry with strong enterprise growth as well as remarkable entry into consumer segment, and the growing entrant Google with its open Android Platform. It is clear that Android, Mac OS X, Blackberry will dominate the North American market and Palm will be a secondary priority for the operators in spite of an innovative webOS platform. Based on the latest results, roughly half of the Palm’s shipments are in carrier channels struggling to sell through and the pressure is likely to increase further as Apple iPhone and Android begins the next innings with major software and hardware revisions in the following quarters. Perhaps Palm need to embrace growing platforms like Android, where operator and consumer interest is on the rise. By developing cross platform interfaces and services such as the Synergy, Palm can still provide a unique user experience on top of Android without betting the farm on webOS. Also, with positive outlook on HTML’s growth and adoption in mobile phones, from the applications development point of view Palm is at an advantage in leveraging its HTML/CSS written webOS in an opportunity to create new revenue vistas through mobile web browser based applications easily which may attract the operators participating in the recently announced “Wholesale Applications Community” at GSMA World Congress in Barcelona. Palm should also keep an eye on in incorporating the evolving wireless technologies (ex: TD-SCDMA, HSPA+, LTE) to expand and diversify its future offerings. So, Palm should for now go with the flow instead going against it and incorporate newer platforms like Android in its portfolio by 2011 instead of pushing the sole struggling webOS devices and thus come up with unique selling propositions satisfying the consumers & operator’s needs. Palm should also focus on striking strong long-term operator relationships especially GSM operators with a well thought and executed go-to-market strategy,and clawback out of this deteriorating situation. Thus, there will not be any need for “Palm” reading, as it will control its own future. - Neil Shah